Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Pernille in Uganda

For several months now, I've been looking in on Pernille's life in Uganda.

At first, I have to admit, I was jealous and suspicious. Who was this lovely, literate Danish development worker living the life that I wanted to be living? She's in Arua, while I'm sitting here chained to the *^%$ laptop. She is buying fresh vegetables in the market and doing something meaningful with her time. I am making sure that Donald Duck has an orange bill while wishing for more (positive) amazon.com reviews for Stalking the Wild Dik-Dik.

She was in Adjumani last year when I was in Murchison Falls. My pals Andrea and Ivo were in Adjumani and they used to have to drive the long way around, through Murchison and across the Nile on the Paraa ferry, to avoid a semi-dangerous route. I think Pernille drove this route too while I was there, but I'm sure I would have stopped her if I'd ever seen her go by in her red truck. I do remember seeing an MS Uganda truck once in Kabalagala but we only exchanged waves (as I was riding in a truck from a similar German agency).

I'm still jealous, but I've been reading Pernille's blog long enough to trust her and enjoy her stories and her photos. As I write this, she's in the Hotel Equatoria in Kampala. I kept meaning to go and check out the rumored laundromat near there, but instead I just washed my clothes (and sometimes Herr Marlboro's when he was in town too) in the bathtub. I once managed to scratch the tub with H. M.'s Levi's. After that, I let him do his own laundry since he was better at it.

6 comments:

Pernille said...

Hi Marie, 1000 thanx for those very nice words. I've only heard of Andrea from Adjumani, somehow I missed out on her, though I've got her number in my mobile, still. Small world. Anyway, the interesting part of driving through Murchinson is the people you give lifts or talk to at Red Chili - so I'm sure you could have been one of those.

I know the feeling of being stuck, but a permanent home+boyfriend+work should never be underestimated! It's a fine balance, and I'm haven't worked it out yet....

Pernille

Marie said...

I sure haven't worked that balance out yet either. I struggle with it. People tell me I'm lucky. I'm not so sure. It's hard to balance an adventurous lifestyle with personal commitment. I've proven to be pretty bad at it so far.

Amanda said...

I'm still working on Stalking the Wild Dik-Dik (you're in the desert on your way to Ethopia right now...), but when I finish it I'll write a (positive) review on Amazon. It's been very enjoyable reading.

By the way, maybe you should ask safari companies if they'll give you a bonus for every referral they get from the book - it's certainly made *me* want to go on a safari! ;)

Marie said...

Thanks! The Dik-Dik story is kind of a precursor to all the Uganda stuff on this blog, and to all the veiled and not-so-veiled references to dramatically failed romance. I think it will all make a complete story when you're done. I hope. No spoilers! I must keep mum.

If really makes you want to go on safari? I thought maybe I went overboard on describing the inconveniences... but they are, IMHO, all part of the fun. Actually, you could probably tell this from the book, but the best was the canoe safari. That was just incredible. Camping at night and canoeing by day. And they did kind of give me a kickback... they let me go on that one for free. I had to pay only the national park fee and then had to write about it on GoNOMAD. Freebies are a mixed bag, but that time it worked out in spades because I could wholeheartedly recommend the experience.

Amanda said...

I think the inconveniences do sound like part of the fun in a way, too. A safari where everything went perfectly just wouldn't be real, would it? The canoeing safari really did sound great, in spite of crocodiles. :) I've always hated lions, but I want to see elephants and giraffes and even hippos, as long as they keep their distance...

The horseback safari is actually one of my favorite parts.

Marie said...

I loved that horseback safari... and it was only a few hours long! It's the same idea as in Nepal, where they put you up on elephants and you get to go close to rhino that way, because the rhino just think you're an elephant.

Animals also don't mind a Toyota Hilux. It's funny to think that I spent all that time and money going on safari in 2001 and then actually lived in the middle of a national park in 2005. Who knew..?

I've been taken in so many times by "When will I be here again? I better do it now."